Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Emmanuel's Scribepost for November 24, 2009

Today in class, we were given an assignment to try and make 1 perfect square, out of 2 squares. Each of our perfect squares had 100 squares inside of them. The square we used for a starting point was 1x1. So that means each little square was 0.1. Then, we kept adding more, and more layers to our square, to try and make it a perfect 2x2 square.

In the making of our perfect 2x2 square, we made a chart for the progress of our square. Every layer we added, we had to calculate the side length, and the area.

This is what the chart looked like:















Once you have completed the 1.4x1.4 square. You would have been left with 4 extra 0.1 length squares.

At the end of the class, Ms. Usiskin asked this question..

Why are they're 4 squares left over?

Well, my guess is, because since we were multiplying the answers by using 0.1 as the inner square number, 1, would be a whole square, and the 0.96 would be one 96th of a whole. And since they are only 96 pieces, thats why there were 4 left over. And because 96 was the maximum amount of full squares you would be able to make the square a regular equal sided square. If you would want to use the four squares, you would have to cut them into very small pieces.

comment lots friends. peace out, atown
-emmanuel <----- you have to highlight..

4 comments:

carla841 said...

great job! i like your post. great explanations.

kevin 8-16 said...

good job ! nice explanations in your post .

elijah841 said...

Hey Emmanuel ,

Sorry for late comment.. (: But yea, good job , you explained all the things very nicely, but you should add a picture of what the square looks like .

vanessa 8-41 said...

Good job Eman ! I do agree with Elijah, you should add a picture of the finished product. Haha ! your funny. You explained everything well and there wasn't really anything wrong so I can't really say anything else other than GOOD JOB !

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